AGC Attending Pennsylvania PFAS Action Team Public Meeting on April 15

As part of Advanced GeoServices’ ongoing efforts to continue servicing clients with PFAS issues, Steve Kirschner will be attending the Pennsylvania PFAS Action Team public meeting on April 15, 2019.  The meeting will discuss:

Image courtesy of Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Image courtesy of Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

  • PFAS Action Team;

  • MCL update;

  • Toxicological issues;

  • PFAS Pilot Study;

  • Laboratory Instrumentation;

  • Land Recycling Program Regulatory Package

  • Staff Sampling Training

  • Drinking Water Sampling Plan

  • EPA PFAS Action Plan

  • Sources, Impacts, & Water Supplier Needs

  • Township Recommendations

  • Redevelopment of the Willow Grove Site

  • PFAS Management

The Pennsylvania PFAS Action Team was created in September 2018 by Governor Wolf to address PFAS issues within the Commonwealth.  The Action Team is led by the secretaries of Environmental Protection, Health, Military and Veteran Affairs, Community and Economic Development, Agriculture, and the State Fire Commissioner.

Steve Kirschner leads the Montrose Emerging Contaminants Team, which is comprised of professionals that address PFAS issues impacting sampling, remediation, brownfields, water treatment, stormwater, air, laboratory instrumentation, chemistry, toxicology, industrial, water supplier, and municipal issues.  Montrose is able to combine our expertise from various experts nationwide to help our clients address their PFAS issues.  To learn more about the PA PFAS Action Team meeting or to discuss, contact:

Steve Kirschner, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
skirschner@advancedgeoservices.com
610.840.9117

PADEP Southeast District Update

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP), Southeast District provided a regulatory update on a variety of topics on June 18, 2018:

PADEP Southeast District Update

  • The District is still trying to fill several Section Chief positions and is hopeful they will be filled in the near future.
  • The Land Recycling Program Technical Guidance Manual (TGM) is currently being updated with a goal of it being finalized later this year. Several plan changes include:
    • Combining the vapor intrusion guidance into the TGM, and
    • Separating the toxicological tables out of the TGM, which will allow the PADEP to more readily make changes in the future.
    •    
  • The Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) investigations of the Department of Defense (DoD) bases in Warminster and Horsham, as well as, the Easton Road PFC and Ridge Run PFC HSCA sites. To date, the sources of the Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (HSCA) sites have not been identified. The District has reported that the PADEP is requiring some industrial National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit renewal applicants to provide data on PFAS; however, the PADEP does not have any current plans to follow in the footsteps of New York State or New Jersey and develop state Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL’s) or initiate/mandate PFAS investigations at potential source sites.

Thanks to the Society of Women Environmental Professionals, Philadelphia Chapter for arranging the PADEP update.

For more information on this topic, contact:

Steve Kirschner, P.E.
Senior Project Professional
610.840.9117

USEPA Classifies TCE as a Carcinogen

USEPA Classifies TCE as a Carcinogen

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recently changed its classification of Trichloroethylene (TCE) from "possible human carcinogen" to human carcinogen in its recently released Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (EPA/635/R-09/011F, September 28, 2011). 

The Toxicological Review is provides specific details and rationale for USEPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) pertaining to TCE.  TCE is a chemical widely used by industry and is often found at contaminated sites, including hundreds of Superfund facilities across the country.

Trichloroethylene is a colorless, volatile organic compound.  It is nonflammable and has a sweet odor.  TCE is often used as a solvent to clean metal parts or used to create other chemicals. At one time it was used as a surgical anesthetic.

Trichloroethylene can be released to air, water, and soil.  TCE is a problematic compound in soil and water since it breaks down very slowly and is removed mostly through evaporation to air. However, TCE does breaks down quickly in air, making it very likely that it will be included as a contaminant of concern in future vapor intrusion standards.    

According to the Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry (ATSDR), "Exposure to moderate amounts of trichloroethylene may cause headaches, dizziness, and sleepiness; large amounts may cause coma and even death. Eating or breathing high levels of trichloroethylene may damage some of the nerves in the face. Exposure to high levels can also result in changes in the rhythm of the heartbeat, liver damage, and evidence of kidney damage. Skin contact with concentrated solutions of trichloroethylene can cause skin rashes.  There is some evidence exposure to trichloroethylene in the work place may cause scleroderma (a systemic autoimmune disease) in some people. Some men occupationally-exposed to trichloroethylene and other chemicals showed decreases in sex drive, sperm quality, and reproductive hormone levels.  There is strong evidence that trichloroethylene can cause kidney cancer in people and some evidence for trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer and malignant lymphoma. Lifetime exposure to trichloroethylene resulted in increased liver cancer in mice and increased kidney cancer and testicular cancer in rats.  It is not known whether children are more susceptible than adults to the effects of trichloroethylene.  Some human studies indicate that trichloroethylene may cause developmental effects such as spontaneous abortion, congenital heart defects, central nervous system defects, and small birth weight. However, these people were exposed to other chemicals as well."

Advanced GeoServices has spent decades working on sites contaminated with TCE.  We have designed many solutions for this complex compound and can help you find a solution for your site.  For more information about trichloroethylene, contact:

Steve Kirchner, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
610.840.9117

Chris Reitman, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
610.840.9123

Pennsylvania updates General Industrial Stormwater Permit regulations

PA Updates General Industrial Stormwater Permit

Pennsylvania recently updated its requirements for the General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater Associated with Industrial Activity, which include:

  • New sector-specific requirements;
  • Stormwater pollutants benchmarking;
  • Semi-annual outfalls inspections and sampling;
  • eDMR system reporting;
  • Annual renewal; and
  • Annual renewal, including reports and $500 payment.

If you have a General Industrial Stormwater Permit, these new regulations will affect you.  Contact us so we can help you understand how these new requirements will affect you:

Steve Kirschner, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
610.840.9117

Chris Reitman, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
610.840.9123