AGC Industrial Site Featured in Regenesis Video

Joseph Chiappetta, LSRP

Historical activities at a former lock manufacturing plant in New Jersey resulted in the contamination of soils with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and groundwater affected by a dissolved phase VOC plume originating from an area containing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL).  Contamination extends to the fractured bedrock aquifer.  

Advanced GeoServices successfully completed the delineation of the 177-acre contamination plume in both the unconsolidated and the bedrock aquifers and designed an in-situ injection remedy for the treatment of the plume.  We designed and oversaw the installation of the vapor intrusion mitigation system on the Site building and surrounding properties.  We utilized Modeling and Risk Assessments to limit the investigation and remediation to the area and media in which there were impacted receptors.

For more information about this project, contact:

Joseph Chiappetta, LSRP
Senior Project Consultant
201.705.4283

AGC Part of Adventure Aquarium's Penguin Exhibit Renovation Team

Penguin Exhibit at Adventure Aquarium

Adventure Aquarium in Camden, NJ has announced that its Penguin Island exhibit, home to their largest African penguin colony, will undergo major renovations that are specifically designed for the health and wellness of the animals.  Advanced GeoServices has been a proud participant in the design of these new renovations.

AGC is the aquarium’s civil engineering consultant for the renovations to Penguin Island, which originally opened in 1998.  In its initial phase of construction, this exhibit will receive new beach landscape custom rock-work with radiant heat around its 17,000 gallon pool. The pool itself will be converted to salt water in keeping with the bird’s natural habitat.

The second phase of construction will focus on the back-of-house operations of the exhibit with renovations and an expansion of the facility that will assist the aquarium’s staff in the care of the penguins, including a new holding pool and new nesting areas.

Advanced GeoServices’ civil design for the renovation included a site survey, geotechnical testing, new walkways, drainage design, and grading. We join Adventure Aquarium in celebrating this exciting project!

Read more at: http://www.adventureaquarium.com/What-To-Do/Attractions/Renovation-Progress

To learn more about this project, contact:

Barry G. Stingel, RLA, ASLA
Project Consultant
610.840.9182
 

 

4-Log Virus Inactivation Treatment for Drinking Water Systems

GPM Associates an Advanced GeoServices company

GPM Associates, an Advanced GeoServices company, has successfully designed systems to treat bacteria in drinking water systems, such as E-Coli and Total Coliform.  

GPM Associates recently completed the design and environmental permitting for new 4-Log virus inactivation treatment systems for several Public Community (PC) and Public Non-Community (PNC) water supply systems with groundwater supply wells, using a new chlorination feed system or multi-barrier, validated, ultra-violet (UV) light disinfection system.

virus inactivation treatment for bacteria in water systems

One project example includes the following: At a campground located in northern New Jersey that has its own PNC water supply system, Total Coliform bacteria and E-Coli bacteria were detected in the exisiting groundwater supply wells.  GPM Associates provided professional services to assist the campground with several items, including responding to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s (NJDEP) Corrective Action Plan to resolve non-compliance issues including E-Coli bacteria contamination, environmental permitting, and full design of new 4-log virus inactivation treatment systems for several wells.  Services also included submitting a Groundwater Protection Plan to the NJDEP and working with the NJDEP, the local county health department, and the client to see the project through to its successful completion.  The system design included using sodium hypochlorite solution feed systems with plug flow contact piping for the groundwater supply wells.  As part of the Corrective Action Plan’s requirements, GPM also assisted the campground with updating water distribution plans, GIS mapping, and completing water and wastewater distribution system evaluations.  Since the camping season was approaching, this project had a tight schedule and GPM was able to provide its professional services to assist the client in getting the new treatment systems online, resolving the bacteria issues, and bring the system back into safe drinking water compliance with NJDEP, prior to the start of the camping season.

To learn more about 4-log virus inactivation treatment systems, please contact:

Rick Shoyer
856.354.2273

AGC Published in New Jersey Business Magazine

Advanced GeoServices was published in the March 2017 edition of New Jersey Business magazine's March 2017 LSRPs Make Positive Change special section.  Our article, "Environmental Investigations in New Jersey: Special Challenges Encountered in Urban Areas," by Christopher T. Reitman, P.E.; Joseph Chiappetta, LSRP; Christopher Valligny, LSRP; and Rick Shoyer, LSRP describes the challenges that may accompany revitalizing properties in urban areas in New Jersey.  The article stresses that working with an LSRP and advanced planning can help minimize common challenges, such as:

  • Urban Space
  • Unexpected Groundwater Flow or Vapor Migration Patterns
  • Obtaining Access from a Neighbor
  • Other Sources of Contamination

To learn more about solutions for complex site in New Jersey, please contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
Senior Project Consultant
856.354.2273

Joe Chiappetta, LSRP
Senior Project Consultant
201.705.4283

Utilizing Multiple Technologies to Remediate a Complex Site in NJ

Advanced GeoServices utilized several technologies to remediate a former manufacturing site.  Historical activities at the plant resulted in the contamination of soils, groundwater, surface water, and indoor air.   Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and Trichloroethene (TCE) were discovered in the subsurface media from the historical use of the Site.  The groundwater had been affected by chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as PCE and TCE. 

Utilizing Multiple Technologies to Remediate a Complex Site

We successfully delineated the 177-acre contamination plume in both the unconsolidated and the bedrock aquifers.  Because the site was extremely complex, we utilized Modeling and Risk Assessments to limit the amount and the cost of the Investigation as well as limiting remediation in areas where risks to human health or the environment were negligible.  AGC designed and oversaw implementation of the various remedial technologies, including injecting a combination of Persulfox, Plumestop and HRC in source area, Plumestop and HRC in two passive reactive barrier walls:

  • Persulfox to oxidize the TCE source area
  • Plumestop to provide an adsorption media to capture residual dissolved TCE
  • The HRC provided an anaerobic environment to promote microbial degradation of the TCE adsorbed by the Plumestop
  • The reactive barrier walls provided protection of the stream by adsorbing the TCE dissolved phase plume
  • The HRC providing an anaerobic environment for microbes to degrade the adsorbed TCE

As part of the reporting requirements, AGC prepared:

  • Vapor Concern Mitigation Plan
  • Immediate Environmental Concern (IEC) Annual Report, including a Site Investigation and a Remedial Action Report
  • Classification Exception Area Report
  • Remedial Investigation Report (RIR)
  • Remedial Action Workplan/Permit-By-Rule Request

To learn more about this project or how combining multiple technologies could remediate your site, contact:

Joe Chiappetta, LSRP
Senior Project Consultant
201.705.4283
 

NJ Issues Mandatory Cessation of Dry Cleaning Equipment in Residential Buildings

Dry Cleaners to Cease Operations in Residential Buildings

Recently NJDEP issued new regulations regarding perchloro-ethylene ("PERC") and dry cleaners.  The regulatory agency mandated that all dry cleaning equipment located at co-located residential locations to cease operations by December 21, 2020. See 40 CFR Part 63.322(o)(5):

  • After December 21, 2020, the owner or operator shall eliminate any emission of PCE from any dry cleaning system that is located in a building with a residence.  In order to comply with these regulations, dry cleaning equipment owners/operators must:
  • Conduct monthly inspections for vapor leaks according to EPA Method 21 if the dry cleaning equipment was installed after December 21, 2005.
  • Eliminate any emission of PCE during the transfer of articles between the washer and the dryer(s) or reclaimer(s).
  • Eliminate any emission of PCE from any dry cleaning system that is installed (including relocation of a used machine) after December 21, 2005, and that is located in a building with a residence.
  • After December 21, 2020, the owner or operator shall eliminate any emission of PCE from any dry cleaning system that is located in a building with a residence.
  • Sources demonstrating compliance under Section 63.320(b)(2)(ii) shall operate the dry cleaning system inside a vapor barrier enclosure and conduct a weekly inspection of the machine components for vapor leaks.

PERC dry cleaning operations have routinely been the source of contamination to soil, groundwater and indoor air at properties located across the country. PERC is a known carcinogen and therefore a highly regulated chemical.  PERC vapors can easily migrate through the ground into the air and affect the air quality of indoor buildings.

Please contact one of our New Jersey offices to discuss your compliance options:

SOUTHERN NJ
Rick Shoyer, LSRP
856.354.2273

NORTHERN NJ
Joe Chiappetta, LSRP
201.705.4283

Historic Fill to be Remediated in New Jersey

New Jersey Historic Fill Remediation

There has been many questions regarding how to handle historic fill at remediation sites in New Jersey.  The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has clarified their requirements according to the NJDEP's Site Remediation Program Site Remediation Reform Act (SRRA):

"As currently defined in statute, historic fill meets the definition of a discharge within the Spill Compensation and Control Act (N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11) and therefore requires remediation. The Brownfield and Contaminated Sites Act (N.J.S.A. 58:10B-1 et seq.) provides a rebuttable presumption that the Department shall not require any person to remove or treat historic fill in order to comply with applicable health risk or environmental standards in 58:10B-12h but it does not alter the requirement to remediate. In these areas engineering and institutional controls are designed to prevent exposure to humans. The Site Remediation Reform Act (N.J.S.A. 58:10C-1 et seq.) exempts reporting historic fill to the Department's Hotline at N.J.S.A. 58:10C-16k but it also does not alter the requirement to remediate." 

"Remediation" can be achieved through institutional (e.g., deed notice) and engineering controls (e.g., asphalt paving).

The NJDEP’s GeoWeb map provides areas where NJDEP has identified as “fill areas”.  This does not automatically mean that these areas have “historic fill” above regulatory standards. 

If you require further clarification on how to handle historic fill at your remediation site, please contact one of our New Jersey offices:

SOUTHERN NJ
Rick Shoyer, LSRP
856.354.2273

NORTHERN NJ
Joe Chiappetta, LSRP
201.705.4283
 

Proposed Rule for Sanitary Landfills

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) recently published a proposed rule pertaining to sanitary landfills in the New Jersey Register.  A summary of NJDEP's proposal is below, courtesy of the Chemistry Council of New Jersey:

Legacy Landfill Law (Law)

sanitary landfill
  • The proposed Legacy Landfill Law establishes requirements and controls applicable to legacy landfills and closed sanitary landfill facilities that accept new materials after closure in order to, for example, prepare the landfill surface for redevelopment.  A legacy landfill is a landfill that ceased operations prior to January 1, 1982, and received for disposal solid waste or waste material that was received for disposal prior to October 21, 1976 that is included within the definition of RCRA hazardous waste.  Part of the jurisdiction of this law is the integration of the Law’s requirements into the existing Solid Waste Rules to address closure/post-closure care and disruption of all sanitary landfills; and
     
  • Extending some requirements of the Law to all sanitary landfills.

Other new technical requirements include the following:

Air Pollution Control

  • Amend these rules to address the hydrogen sulfide emission standard included in the Law

Solid Waste Rules

  1. Clarify the definitions of “contaminated soil”, “clean fill”, and “solid waste” in the Solid Waste and Recycling Rules; DEP is not proposing to change how a generator manages/handles contaminated soil or clean fill
     
  2. NEW definition: Contaminated Soil – “soil, soil-like material, or mixtures of soil with other material containing concentrations of one or more contaminants that exceed the residential direct contact soil remediation standards or non-residential direct contact soil remediation standards, whichever is more stringent, as set forth in N.J.A.C. 7:26D, Remediation Standards”
     
  3. DELETED definition: Clean Fill (in order to avoid the possibility of the same material meeting both the definition of “clean fill” and the new proposed definition of “contaminated soil”); DEP is not proposing to change the definition of “clean fill” under the SRWMP Rules.
     
  4. AMENDED definition: Solid Waste – “any garbage, refuse, sludge, processed or unprocessed mixed construction and demolition debris, including, but not limited to, wallboard, plastic, wood, or metal, or any other waste material, except it shall not include the following…”
     
  5. Solid Waste excludes materials which are defined as “non-water-soluble, non-decomposable, inert solids, such as rock, soil, gravel, concrete, glass, and/or clay or ceramic products that do not contain concentrations of one or more contaminants that exceed the residential direct contact soil remediation standards or non-residential direct contact soil remediation standards, whichever is more stringent, as set forth in N.J.A.C. 7:26D, Remediation Standards”.
     
  6. Currently, a Beneficial Use Determination is required prior to transporting soil that does not exceed SRS off-site for reuse. However, under the proposed rule, if soil has been determined to not exceed the concentration criteria of (new) N.J.A.C. 7:26-1.6(a)6 and is not considered a solid waste, this soil would also be exempt from the requirements of N.J.A.C. 7:26-1.1(a)1ii (Scope of Rules) and N.J.A.C. 7.26-1.7(g)4iv (Exemption from Solid Waste Facility Permitting). In other words, the generator of this soil would not be required to obtain a Beneficial Use approval from DEP.

There is some industry concern that the new definition of “soil” may adversely impact the option of beneficially re-using soils with contaminant concentrations below the threshold outlined in NJAC 7:26-1.6(a)6.   

A public hearing concerning the proposal occurred on Friday, September 23, 2016 at 10:00 A.M.  Written comments are due to NJDEP by October 14, 2016.  

If you would like to learn more about regulatory changes to sanitary landfills or would like to discuss your landfill site, please contact:

Veronica Foster, P.E.
Senior Project Consultant
856.354.2273

NJDEP Recommends New PFOA Limit

NJDEP publishes new recommended PFOA limit

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has recommended a new maximum level for the chemical PFOA, amid protests from environmentalists and legislators.  This is only a recommendation - there will be a public comment period through the The New Jersey Drinking Water Quality Institute, which recommended the new limit to NJDEP.  

Although NJDEP may alter this recommendation when it publishes its final rule, the new recommended level is 14 parts per trillion (ppt), which is significantly lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 70 parts per trillion level and lower than the state's strict level of 40 ppt.

PFOA has long history of being used in such products as stain-resistant clothing, non-stick cookware, and some fire-fighting foams.  PFOA's strong chemical bond makes it desirable for industrial uses but is difficult to metabolize in humans. Long-term exposure can lead to many diseases.  In addition, it's strong chemical bond makes it difficult to break down in the environment.  

Once the public comment period is over, the Water Quality Institute will make a final recommendation to NJDEP, which will in turn set the final level.

For more information on PFOA and water quality standards, please contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
Senior Project Consultant
856.354.2273

How to Remove PFOA and PFOS

How to Remove PFOA and PFOS

The Water Research Foundation (WRF) found that aeration, chlorine dioxide, dissolved air flotation, coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, granular filtration, and microfiltration were all ineffective for removing PFASs (poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances), including PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) and PFOS (perfluorooctanesulfonic acid). Anion exchange was moderately effective in treating PFOA, highly effective for PFOS, and failed to remove several other PFASs. Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis proved to be the most effective methods of removing even the smallest PFASs. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was shown to be adept at removing most PFASs and it may be the average utility’s best bet for PFOA and PFOS contamination.

According to the WRF, PFOA and/or PFOS occurrence has been discovered in 30 states. The WRF advised that any water treatment plant that’s near a chemical manufacturing operation or military base should be on alert for PFASs contamination.

For more information on this topic or to discuss your site needs, contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
856.354.2273

NJDEP Increasing Fees

NJDEP Increasing Fees

Each year the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection is required to compile its "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report," which documents the anticipated fee increases for various items.  As of July 1, 2016 the following fees will increase:

For Annual Remediation Fees, if the invoice sent by the Department is dated:

  • On or before June 30, 2016, the Annual Remediation Fees listed in the June 2015 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply
  • On or after July 1, 2016, the Annual Remediation Fees described in the July 5, 2016 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply

For Remedial Action Permit Annual Fees, if the invoice sent by the Department is dated:

  • On or before June 30, 2016, the Remedial Action Permit Annual Fees listed in the June 2015 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply
  • On or after July 1, 2016, the Remedial Action Permit Annual Fees described in the July 5, 2016 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply

For the Remedial Action Permit Activity Fees, if the permit activity (application, modification, transfer, termination) is administratively complete and is post-marked:

  • On or before June 30, 2016, the Remedial Action Permit Activity Fees listed in the June 2015 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply
  • On or after July 1, 2016, the Remedial Action Permit Activity Fees described in the July 5, 2016 version of the "Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report" apply

For more information on these fee increases, visit the Annual Site Remediation Reform Act Program Fee Calculation Report webpage.

If you have questions about these fees, please contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
856.354.2273

Joe Chiappetta, LSRP
201.705.4283
 

Revised Administrative Guidance on Response Action Outcomes

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection uses a list serve to communicate to the public with respect to the Site Remediation Reform Act (SRRA).  Below is the latest guidance notification published on the list serve.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (Department) is announcing the availability of the revised administrative guidance "Issuance of Response Action Outcomes (RAOs)." Since the implementation of the ARRCS rules, the regulated community has provided substantial constructive input regarding the original guidance document, which was posted in May 2011. Some of the updates to the guidance document include:

  • A comprehensive explanation for each section of the document, including the addition of examples and scenarios
  • The application of media-specific situations within the Scope of Remediation section
  • The application of Limited Conveyance 
  • Instructions and use of all Notices
  • Consolidation of Notices regarding Child Care Facilities in one section
  • Addition of a Response Action Outcome Quick Reference Checklist
  • Instructions on amending the language in a Response Action Outcome
  • Instructions on withdrawing a Response Action Outcome

This guidance and a Change Log describing the updates are posted on the Department's website at www.nj.gov/dep/srp/guidance/.

Also as part of this updated guidance, the Department is amending the "Soil Contamination From an Off-Site Source Not Remediated - Diffuse Anthropogenic Pollution" and the "Historically Applied Pesticides Not Addressed" Notices, and making available a new Notice, specific to "Ground Water Contamination due to Regional Historic Fill (Ground Water confirmation sampling has not been conducted)."  These Notices are available on the Department's website at www.nj.gov/dep/srp/regs/arrcs/index.html, under Section E., New Response Action Outcome Notices.

If you have questions regarding the Site Remediation Reform Act or Response Action Outcomes, please contact Rick Shoyer at:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
rshoyer@advancedgeoservices.com
856.354.2273

AGC Published in New Jersey Business magazine

AGC's Rick Shoyer wrote an article for the special LSRPA section of the March 2016 edition of the New Jersey Business magazine.  The special section is called "Assessing the Transition: Cleaning up New Jersey with Licensed Site Remediation Professionals."

The article written by Rick is on page 67 of the edition and is titled "Hidden Costs of Restricted Use Response Action Outcomes”.  It outlines scenarios to ponder when considering RAOs for sites and offers suggestions on how to limit costs.

For more information on RAOs, contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
rshoyer@advancedgeoservices.com
856.354.2273

Register at Early Bird Rates for BCONE Northeast Sustainable Communities Workshop

Two Days Left for Early Bird Registration!

Register by February 18th for discounted rates - save up to $50 over the standard rate.

BCONE NSCW

http://brownfieldcoalitionne.org/event-2053299

Now in its 7th year, the Brownfield Coalition of the Northeast (BCONE) will be hosting the Northeast Sustainable Communities Workshop (NSCW) 2016 at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) in Newark, New Jersey on March 16, 2016. The NSCW's goal is to break new ground, offer new ideas, and posit new concepts on the topics of sustainability, collaboration and leverage, contamination, resiliency, brownfields, technology, and their impact on community revitalization. Our past events have been attended by representatives from government, community groups, higher education, professional organizations, and laboratories, as well as attorneys, developers, contractors, and consultants.

This year's theme is "Imagination and Creativity in Urban Change for the NJ/NY/CT/PA Metropolitan Area." NSCW is like no other conference you've attended. PowerPoint presentations are sparse and image-only; speakers are concise, yet informative; and, there is plenty of time in each session for dialogue, challenges, and questions between attendees, speakers, and moderators. Come be a part of the conversation.

As always, those in the center of these policy decisions speak in panel format that includes representatives from all states in the region. Everyone who attends NSCW is an active participant in shaping the ideas, projects, and policies that will guide the revitalization and redevelopment of our region- CT, NY, NJ, and PA- for years to come. The impact of the day is to have everyone leave more knowledgeable, more committed, and more inspired to influence the changes necessary in our professional and personal lives to create a more enduring and resilient life working with, and not against, nature.

Keynote Speaker:  Michael Riccio, CFO and Treasurer, Panasonic Corporation of North America

Mr. Riccio, who was responsible for overseeing the construction of and relocation to the new LEED-certified Platinum and Gold Panasonic facility in Newark, will discuss how Panasonic is integrating sustainability initiatives into their business operations, including the new LEED-certified facility in Newark, and how they are applying concepts from global operations, such as the Fujisawa (Japan) Sustainable Smart Town model, here in the US.  

"Panasonic takes seriously its responsibility to support a sustainable future. We are delighted our headquarters earned both LEED Platinum and Gold Certifications and hope that other new buildings being constructed in therevitalization of thecity of Newark will be designed to achieve the same environmental and energy standards."- Mike Riccio

So please join us at NJIT, Newark, NJ on March 16, 2015 for what promises to be an extraordinary event.  

  • NSCW is an event approved for USEPA Brownfield Grantees. Contact your USEPA Regional Brownfield Coordinator.
  • Register at the early bird rates! Rates will increase on February 19, 2016, so take advantage of these great rates now! Don't wait, as this event has sold out in the past and will likely sell out again!
  • Sponsorship Opportunities available.

Early bird rates until February 18th! 
 
Link to Register - http://brownfieldcoalitionne.org/event-2053299

For more information about this conference, contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
rshoyer@advancedgeoservices.com
856.905.2218

Rick Shoyer helps facilitate BCONE December 2015 New Jersey CVP/SRAG Meeting

BCONE-logo.png

Advanced GeoServices’ Rick Shoyer, LSRP recently helped the Brownfields Coalition of the Northeast (BCONE) organize and facilitate the December 2015 New Jersey CVP/SRAG meeting.  A link to the meeting minutes is below.  Some key highlights from the meeting were:

  • 2,000 cases do not have an LSRP assigned to them;
  • There are only 12-13 case in Direct Oversight enforcement;
  • NJDEP stated “…once in Direct Oversight, the case remains in Direct Oversight”;
  • NJDEP continues to work on multiple new guidance and updates to existing guidance;
  • Panel discussions on:
  • Cleanups by 3rd Parties and Municipal entities;
  • Records Requests.
  • 1,4-Dioxane Interim Standard Change and Potential Impacts on existing Cases

http://brownfieldcoalitionne.org/resources/Documents/SRAG-meeting-minutes-15-1209.pdf

Please contact Rick Shoyer if you have any questions regarding the minutes or wish to discuss potential topics Rick should bring up at future NJDEP CVP/SRAG meetings.

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
rshoyer@advancedgeoservices.com
856.336.5100

Ground Water Quality Standard 1,4-Dioxane; CAS Registry #123-91-1

In accordance with the New Jersey Ground Water Quality Standards rules at N.J.A.C. 7:9C-1.7, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has developed an interim specific ground water quality criterion of 0.4 μg/L and PQL of 0.1 μg/L for 1,4-Dioxane.  Pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:9C-1.9 (c), the applicable constituent standard is 0.4 μg/L.  

1,4-Dioxane is used as a solvent, a laboratory reagent and as a trace contaminant in the manufacture of cosmetics.  Its primary use was as a stabilizer of the solvent 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) (CAS Registry # 71-55-6) and it is often detected in association with TCA.  In the lab, low levels of 1,4-Dioxane is difficult to detect, especially when chlorinated solvents are present.  For the laboratory to obtain the PQL or standard, a separate analytical run is required for low level compounds.

This new interim 1,4-Dioxane standard is an order of magnitude change (over 10 times the previous standard).  The ramifications of this are that all cases within the Site Remediation Program (SRP) are required to re-evaluate whether this new standard constitutes a new compound of concern requiring further investigation, delineation and remediation.
NJDEP has estimated that there are approximately 155 cases in the SRP that have TCA as a compound of concern.  Of these cases, NJDEP estimates less than half may have 1,4-Dioxane present above the standard.  Of these cases, approximately 24 are subject to the May 7, 2016 remedial investigation deadline.

The LSRP should evaluate the laboratory data to determine whether 1,4-Dioxane is reported as not detected with a reporting limit of 4 µg/l or less.  If this data exists, using the 10x rule, further investigation is not required.  If the data does not exist, further investigation is required.  Unfortunately, scientific analysis of the movement of 1,4-Dioxane in groundwater suggests this compound becomes a leading edge of the contaminant plume, moving further and faster than other compounds.  This may result in the need for additional delineation, receptor evaluation and sentinel wells.  This change could also trigger a new evaluation of previously remediated sites or sites at which a permitted engineering control is in place.

For SRP cases subject to the May 7, 2016 deadline this becomes a new unexpected challenge.  LSRPs and the regulated community are requesting that the NJDEP provide relief for special cases involving 1,4-Dioxane.For more information on the NJDEP’s November 25, 2015 revised Interim Ground Water Quality Standards, including 1,4-Dioxane, see:

http://www.nj.gov/dep/srp/regs/gwqs/srwmp_implementing_11-25-15_interim_gwqs.pdf.

If you have questions regarding this standard, please contact:

Rick Shoyer, LSRP
rshoyer@advancedgeoservices.com
856-905-2218

AGC Acquires G.P.M. Associates

Advanced GeoServices Acquires G.P.M. Associates

Sadly, the founder of G.P.M. Associates, David Monie, a longtime friend of Advanced GeoServices passed away November 30, 2015.  In keeping with Dave’s requests to continue his legacy of providing quality engineering services to their Clients, Advanced GeoServices is honored to have the G.P.M. Team join our organization. 

Founded in 1976, G.P.M Associates Inc. specializes in providing consulting, management and design services in all facets of the water and sewer industry. The company has operated and managed water and sewer companies, designed and obtained permits for all components of a water system, prepared hydrogeologic, hydraulic, and operations and management studies as well as financial analyses and capital improvements studies.  The GPM staff is involved with both local and national professional organizations and has volunteered considerable expertise to public agencies on water-related issues.
Advanced GeoServices was founded in 1992 to provide high quality engineering services in the following areas: environmental, geotechnical, civil/site, land planning, surveying, landscape architecture, water/wastewater, & municipal services.  We are headquartered in West Chester Pennsylvania, with offices in northern and central New Jersey and Lancaster, PA.  Our staff of over 50 professionals has earned the reputation of getting the job done correctly, on time, and under budget.  

We welcome the G.P.M. Team and look forward to becoming a part of your Team. 

If you have questions about Advanced GeoServices acquiring GPM Associates please contact::

Rick Shoyer
GPM ASSOCIATES
an Advanced GeoServices Company
1878 Marlton Pike East, Suite 10
P.O. Box 605
Cherry Hill, NJ 08003
Ph. (856) 354-2273; Fax (856) 354-8236

Expanding LSRP Services

Advanced GeoServices is “all-in” in New Jersey.  We have expanded our LSRP and environmental services capabilities with the addition of Christopher D. Valligny, MS, LSRP, our third LSRP.  Mr. Valligny has been in the environmental field for thirteen (13) years.  He has been a licensed Subsurface Evaluator since 2008 and a LSRP since 2014.  He has managed hundreds of investigation and remediation projects related to leaking underground storage tanks (UHOT and LSRP) throughout NJ.   Mr. Valligny has also conducted Phase I and II Environmental Site Assessments in PA, DE and NJ.  He has successfully designed and overseen remediation programs using innovative in-situ technologies.  He has also designed and conducted many endangered species surveys and managed the oversight of herbicide applications at power generation facilities.  He is a member of the Licensed Site Remediation Professionals Association.  

Expanding LSRP Services